Residential Track

Types of Residential Garage Door Tracks

There are several types of residential garage door tracks on the market. These types can be described by the length of the radius of the curved section of the track or the minimum amount of headroom required to ensure the appropriate fit:

STANDARD RADIUS

standard radius

Extension Spring
Headroom:
12″ Radius = 10″ Required
15″ Radius = 12″ Required

EZ-SET® Torsion &
Standard Torsion

Headroom:
12″ Radius = 12″ Required
15″ Radius = 14″ Required
Sideroom = 3¾” Required

A standard radius track is the most popular type and works well for most garage door installations. The most common option is a 15” radius, which requires 15” of headroom to accommodate the curve of the track and other components, hardware and equipment. A 12” radius is sometimes preferable because it takes up less headroom. However, a 12” radius can place additional strain on the motor, as it requires more work to move the door sections through the curved section of the track. There are also 20” and 32” radius options available, although these require additional headroom.

When installing a standard 15” radius track with extension springs, you’ll need approximately 12” of headroom to ensure the proper fit. A 12” track requires 10” of headroom. When using torsion springs, you’ll need a 14” headroom space for a 15” track and 12” of headroom for a 12” track, as well as at least 3 ¾” of side room space on either side.

LOW HEADROOM

FRONT MOUNT
low headroom front

Extension Spring
Headroom = 4½” Required

EZ-SET® Torsion &
Standard Torsion

Headroom = 9½” Required
Sideroom = 6″ Required

 

The low headroom is another popular residential garage door track option and is often the best choice for installations where headroom space is limited — usually under 12”. Most headroom tracks feature a dual-track installation — a second track is installed above section of horizontal track at the point where it attaches to the curved section. The second track facilitates the movement of the top section to enable the lower sections to move seamlessly along the bottom track portions. The low headroom type of residential door track also works well for doors with oversized top sections.

There are two low headroom track mounting options: front mount and rear mount. When using an extension spring with the front mount version, 4½” of headroom is required. When using a torsion spring, you will need 9½” of headroom and 6” of side room. The rear mount version requires a torsion spring and 5” of headroom and 6” of side room.

LOW HEADROOM

REAR MOUNT
low headroom rear

Standard Torsion
Headroom = 5″ Required
Sideroom = 6″ Required

The low headroom is another popular residential garage door track option and is often the best choice for installations where headroom space is limited — usually under 12”. Most headroom tracks feature a dual-track installation — a second track is installed above section of horizontal track at the point where it attaches to the curved section. The second track facilitates the movement of the top section to enable the lower sections to move seamlessly along the bottom track portions. The low headroom type of residential door track also works well for doors with oversized top sections.

There are two low headroom track mounting options: front mount and rear mount. When using an extension spring with the front mount version, 4½” of headroom is required. When using a torsion spring, you will need 9½” of headroom and 6” of side room. The rear mount version requires a torsion spring and 5” of headroom and 6” of side room.

HIGH LIFT

high lift

Standard Torsion
High lift equals distance from top of door to bottom of horizontal track.
Maximum high lift equals headroom available minus 14″
Sideroom = 4½” Required

The high lift track is a variation of the standard radius track and designed for garages with a ceiling that taller than the attached home, or in situations where extra clearance is necessary for avoiding obstacles. This version features a longer vertical track and shorter horizontal track to enable the door to move out of the opening. A larger portion of the door remains in the horizontal position while the door is open.

High lift tracks operate via torsion springs. The appropriate high lift position equals the distance from the bottom of the horizontal track to the top of the door. To calculate the maximum high lift, determine the available headroom and subtract 14”. This type of track also requires 4½” of side room on either side of the opening.

Headroom = Top of door to nearest obstruction (truss, ceiling, or light fixture). Up to 3″ of additional headroom may be required for a trolley door opener.

View Commercial Track Options